Introduction to Printer

1. Arrowsmith of printer & photocopier

Arrowsmith or Arrowsmiths may refer to: A person who makes arrows (see fletching and bowyer) Arrowsmith (novel), by Sinclair Lewis Arrowsmith (film), 1931 adaptation of the novel Arrowsmith (comics) The Arrowsmith Program, a brain training program for students with learning disabilities Arrowsmith School, a school for children with learning disabilities Arrowsmith Holidays, a British holiday tour operator later part of Laker Airways J. W.

Introduction to Printer 1

Arrowsmith, British book printer, publisher, and imprint Arrowsmith System, a knowledge discovery system

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2. The Pitman's Pay of printer & photocopier

Thomas Wilson's "The Pitmans Pay" was first printed in a Newcastle magazine called "Mitchell's Magazine" in 1826. Further sections were printed in 1828 and 1830.

It was later republished by George Watson, a Gateshead printer. A further book, A collection of selected songs by Gateshead composer Thomas Wilson, which included The Pitmans Pay, was reprinted 14 years after his death in 1872. Much of the work uses words in the local Geordie dialect.

For translations, see Geordie dialect words.

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3. Biography of printer & photocopier

Lance was born in Boulogne, France.

He first came to New Zealand in 1856 to visit his brothers. He contested the 1866 election for the superintendency of the Canterbury Provincial Council against William Sefton Moorhouse representing the runholders; he came a distant second. On 12 July 1865, Lance was appointed to the New Zealand Legislative Council.

Introduction to Printer 2

His membership lapsed on 18 October 1867 through absence. He represented the Cheviot electorate from 1884 to 1890. He contested the Ashley electorate in the 1890 election and was defeated by Richard Meredith.

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4. Public office of printer & photocopier

He was elected as an "Independent Greenback" for the Assembly's 2nd Washington County district (the Towns of Addison, Barton, Farmington, Kewaskum, Trenton, Wayne and West Bend) in 1877, receiving 995 votes against 735 for George H. Kleffler, who had served in the Assembly's 1868 session as a Democrat, but was running as a Republican (Democratic incumbent Nicholaus Marx was not a candidate for re-election).

He did not run for re-election in 1878, and was succeeded by Democrat John G. Frank.

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5.

Robert Aitken (publisher) of printer & photocopier

:For others similarly named, see the Robert Aitken navigation page Robert Aitken (17341802) was a Philadelphia printer and the first to publish an English language Bible in the newly formed United States. He was born in Dalkeith, Scotland. He emigrated to Philadelphia in 1769, where he published the Pennsylvania Magazine, or American Monthly Museum in 177576.

Starting in Philadelphia as a bookseller in 1769 and 1771, Aitken started publication of The Pennsylvania Magazine in 1775, continuing through 1776. He also printed copies of the New Testament in 1777, 1778, 1779, and 1781. He died in Philadelphia in 1802.

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6. Shops of printer & photocopier

The street is one of Cambridge's shopping streets. The shops include a high proportion of independent shops and boutiques as well as some well-known high street names.

Trinity College owns most of the buildings in the street, for example the building that houses the J Sainsbury food store, the main central Cambridge supermarket, on Sidney Street and Green Street. Other notable shops and restaurants include Bills, Harriet's Caf and Tea Room, Sundaes Shoes, Harriet Kelsall Bespoke Jewellery, Oska, Cateby's, Susie Watson Designs and Modish.

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7.

Francis Bailey of printer & photocopier

Francis Bailey (September 3, 1744 November 1, 1817) was a Revolutionary War printer, publisher and journalist in Pennsylvania from 1771 to 1807. He began publication of the Lancaster Almanac in Lancaster, PA in 1771 and published the United States Magazine in 1778. In 1781, he became editor of the Freeman's Journal.

In addition to printing editions of the Articles of Confederation and Thomas Paine's Common Sense, he acted as printer for Congress and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. He was the first America publisher of the writings of Emanuel Swedenborg in 1787.

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8.

Zachariah Poulson of printer & photocopier

Zachariah Poulson (17611844) was an American editor and publisher. Poulson was born in Philadelphia in 1761. In 1800, he purchased Claypoole's American Daily Advertiser, the successor to America's first daily newspaper, the Pennsylvania Packet.

He was state printer for some years, and the publisher of Poulson's Town and Country Almanac, 1789-1801. He also published Proud's History of Pennsylvania, 1797-98. He was a member of several literary and charitable associations, and connected with the Library Company of Philadelphia for 58 years.

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9. Robert Wilkin (politician) of printer & photocopier

Robert Wilkin (18201886) was a 19th-century Member of Parliament in Canterbury, New Zealand. He represented the Kaiapoi electorate from 1863 to 1866, when he retired.

He was a member of the Canterbury Provincial Council. At first, he represented the Timaru electorate (18601862), then the Town of Timaru electorate (18621864) and then the Waitangi electorate (18641866). From July 1860 to November 1863, and from October 1866 to March 1868, he was a member of the Canterbury Executive Council.

He was the province's Deputy Superintendent from 19 July to 14 September 1863.

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10. Ihaia Tainui of printer & photocopier

Ihaia Tainui (died 19 October 1885) was a Mori member of the New Zealand parliament.

He was the son of Wereta Tainui and grandson of Tuhuru Kokare, both chiefs of the Ngi Tahu hap (sub-tribe) Ngti Waewae. He represented the electorate of Southern Maori from 1879 (after Hori Kerei Taiaroa was disqualified) to 1881, when he resigned and Hori Taiaroa resumed the electorate. Tainui committed suicide by hanging on 19 October 1885 in the whare rnanga at Arahura P, north of Hokitika.

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11. Richard Pierce of printer & photocopier

Richard, Rich, Rick, or Dick Pierce may refer to: Dick Pierce (18961966), American football player Richard Pierce (publisher), printer of Publick Occurrences Both Forreign and Domestick Richard S. Pierce, co-author of the PierceBirkhoff conjecture Richard Pierce (historian) (19182004), American historian Rick Pierce, American musician, member of TKO Richard J.

Pierce, American legal scholar at George Washington School of Law Richard Pierce, a character in the 2004 novel Little Children and the 2006 film adaptation Richard Pierce, a character in the 1969 novel The Venom Business

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12. Mary Clark of printer & photocopier

Mary Clark may refer to: Mary Clark (printer) (active 16771696), London printer and publisher Mary Clark Thompson (18351923), philanthropist and wife of banker Frederick Ferris Thompson Mary Kitson Clark (19052005), British archaeologist Mary T. Clark (19132014), American historian of philosophy Mary Higgins Clark (19272020), American author Mary Elizabeth Clark (born 1938), main mover of the AIDS Education and Global Information System Mary Clark-Glass (active since 1974), academic, medical administrator and former politician in Northern Ireland Mary Jane Clark (born 1954), American author Mary Ellen Clark (born 1962), American diver Mary Clark (architect) (born 1936), Canadian architect

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13.

Philip Timms of printer & photocopier

Philip T. Timms (September 16, 1874 August 8, 1973) was a Canadian photographer and printer. As an amateur he was involved in archaeology, history, music, and film.

He was a member of the Royal Photographic Society and the official photographer of the Vancouver Museum. Major J.S.

Matthews stated he "is a real Vancouver pioneer; handpicked, extra special, double refined and forty over proof" and Maclean's Guide to Vancouver described his works as an "invaluable contribution to our cultural heritage".

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14. Carey Carrington of printer & photocopier

Carey John Carrington, Jr.

MLC (1877 14 December 1966) was a member of the New Zealand Legislative Council from 17 June 1926 to 16 June 1933; then 17 June 1933 to 16 June 1940, when his term ended. He was appointed by the Reform Government. He was born in Auckland in the spring of 1877, the eldest son of Carey John Carrington, Sr.

, who had been born in 1844 in Wokingham, Berkshire, and Alicia Mary Josephine Lonergan. In 1903, he married Elizabeth McCashin. He died in Tauranga in 1966 and is buried in Thames Valley.

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15. George Jones (Australian politician) of printer & photocopier

George Alfred Jones (1866 8 April 1938) was an Australian politician. He was born in Inverell to schoolmaster Robert Brown and Helen Moore.

He married Frances Louisa Durnford around 1891 at Surry Hills; they had three children. A printer, he was president of the Typographical Association from 1897 to 1901, and worked with various newspapers. In 1902 he was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly as the Labor member for Inverell.

He transferred to Gwydir in 1904 and served until his defeat in 1913. Jones died at Bondi in 1938.

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16.

Hermitage Bay of printer & photocopier

Hermitage Bay is an expansive bay stretching out along the south coast of Newfoundland. It is a body of Gulf of St. Lawrence which is near the Connaigre Peninsula.

On its south, it is bordered by the Hermitage peninsula and the communities of Seal Cove (Fortune Bay), Hermitage and Sandyville. On its north side it is flanked by the communities of McCallum on mainland Newfoundland and by Gaultois on Long Island. Long Island separates Hermitage Bay from Bay d'Espoir farther inland to the north.

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17. Select bibliography of printer & photocopier

Letters to the Rt. Rev.

J. Hughes, Roman Catholic Bishop of New York, by Kirwan. 2nd series, 1848 Kirwan's letter to Dr.

Cote, on Baptism, with Dr. Cote's reply, 1849 the Decline of Popery and its causes. An address, etc,, New York, 1851 Romanism at home, being letters to the Hon.

Roger B. Taney, 1852 American Principles on National Prosperity. A thanksgiving Sermon (on Ps.

CXVIII.25), etc.', 1854 Kirwan (i.

e., N. Murray) on Bedini and Dr.

Duff. An address, etc, 1854

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18. Cadotte Pass of printer & photocopier

Cadotte Pass, known in the mid to late 1800s as Cadotte's Pass, is a pass in the Rocky Mountains located on the Continental Divide in the U.

S. state of Montana. Pierre Cadotte, a white settler at Fort Benton, Montana, explored the pass in 1851.

Prior to his exploration Tribal people utilized the pass while migrating to the buffalo hunting plains around the Sun River. Isaac Stevens, Territorial Governor of the Montana Territory, named the pass after Cadotte in 1853. The pass is 6,073 feet (1,851 m) above sea level.

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19. Books edited and printed of printer & photocopier

Pierre de La Rame. Arithmeticae libri tres.

1555. Jean-Antoine de Baf. Chant de joie du jour des espousailles de Franois, roi daufin, et de Marie, roine d'cosse.

1558. Pierre Ronsard. La paix.

1559. Nicolas Durand de Villegagnon. Responce par le chevalier de Villegaignon aux Remonstrances faictes la royne mre du roy.

1561. Jacques Androuet du Cerceau. Le second livre d'architecture.

1561. . Jacques Grvin.

Les portraicts anatomiques de toutes les parties du corps humain. 1569. Anton Schneeberger.

Medicamentorum facile parabilium adversus omnis generis articulorum dolores enumeratio. Frankfurt, 1581.

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20.

Navua River of printer & photocopier

The Navua River is located in the island of Viti Levu in Fiji and has its source on the south east slope of Mount Gordon and flows for 65 kilometers to the south coast. It is noted for the scenic beauty of the rugged mountain country through which it flows. In the late 19th century a sugar mill was built on the banks of this river, and although the mill was shut down in 1923, the town of Navua stands on its site.

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21. Anthony Henry Holland of printer & photocopier

Anthony Henry Holland (25 November 1785 10 October 1830) was a Halifax businessman and printer. He was named after and the godson of Anthony Henry (Printer).

Holland is best known for founding the Acadian Recorder in 1813. In 1819, he founded and successfully ran the first paper mill in Atlantic Canada. It was known as the Acadia Paper Mill and was located on the Nine Mile River, near Bedford Basin.

He is buried in the cemetery of the Little Dutch (Deutsch) Church, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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22. Books of printer & photocopier

It put into circulation books of devotion, and published the Bibliothque de la jeunesse chrtienne.

La Touraine was exhibited at the Universal Exhibition of 1855, and was in its day one of the finest of illustrated books. There were the Bible with illustrations from Gustave Dor; Vtault's Charlemagne; Wallon's St. Louis; the Chefs d'oeuvres de la langue franaise.

Quantin, the publisher, calculated that, in 1883, the Mame publishing-house issued yearly six million volumes, of which three million were bound

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23. Gent (surname) of printer

Gent may refer to: Alan Neville Gent (19272012), English physicist Billy Gent (18791957), Australian rules footballer Chris Gent (born 1948), British businessman Don Gent (19331996), Australian rules footballer Edward Gent (18951948), British colony administrator Georgie Gent (born 1988), English tennis player Ian Gent, British computer scientist John Thomas Gent, British clock maker Keith Gent (born 1945), Australian rules footballer Mike Gent (born 1971), American musician Robert Gent-Davis (18571903), English businessman and politician Thomas Gent (16931778), printer and author Peter Gent (19422011), American writer and football player

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24. William Tucker (politician) of printer & photocopier

William Henry Terry Tucker (5 January 1843 19 February 1919) was a New Zealand soldier, farmer, clerk, interpreter, land agent, and politician.

He was born in Auckland, New Zealand in 1843. William Tucker lost his parent early in his life; his mother died when he was two and his father, Henry Tucker, died when he was seven. He was Mayor of Gisborne in 1887 and 1888.

On 22 January 1907, he was appointed to the Legislative Council. He served for one term until 21 January 1914.

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Knowledge About Dot Matrix Printer
Knowledge About Dot Matrix Printer
1. The Algorithm Auction of dot matrix printer The Algorithm Auction is the worlds first auction of computer algorithms. Created by Ruse Laboratories, the initial auction featured seven lots and was held at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum on March 27, 2015. Five lots were physical representations of famous code or algorithms, including a signed, handwritten copy of the original Hello, World! C program by its creator Brian Kernighan on dot-matrix printer paper, a printed copy of 5,000 lines of Assembly code comprising the earliest known version of Turtle Graphics, signed by its creator Hal Abelson, a necktie containing the six-line qrpff algorithm capable of decrypting content on a commercially produced DVD video disc, and a pair of drawings representing OKCupids original Compatibility Calculation algorithm, signed by the company founders. The qrpff lot sold for $2,500. Two other lots were living algorithms, including a set of JavaScript tools for building applications that are accessible to the visually impaired and the other is for a program that converts lines of software code into music. Winning bidders received, along with artifacts related to the algorithms, a full intellectual property license to use, modify, or open-source the code. All lots were sold, with Hello World receiving the most bids. Exhibited alongside the auction lots were a facsimile of the Plimpton 322 tablet on loan from Columbia University, and Nigella, an art-world facing computer virus named after Nigella Lawson and created by cypherpunk and hacktivist Richard Jones. Sebastian Chan, Director of Digital & Emerging Media at the CooperHewitt, attended the event remotely from Milan, Italy via a Beam Pro telepresence robot. ------ 2. Needs for more efficient computer terminals of dot matrix printer During the late 1960 and 1970s, the computing environment expanded beyond the large computer rooms based on card input/output and started to allow data input and output terminals from remote locations. For such purposes, printer terminals such as the IBM 2741, using the traditional asynchronous serial communication (start-stop signaling), and display terminals such as IBM 2260 and IBM 3270, using the new communications protocol set (Binary Synchronous Communications or BSC), became available. There were needs to use a new more efficient communications protocol set and to make available a more efficient and reliable remote printer and display terminals. To satisfy such needs, IBM 3767 serial printer and IBM 3770 communications system (including a line printer) became available as part of the "Advanced Communications Function" (ACF) announcement which included the new System Network Architecture (SNA) and Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) communications protocol set, followed by another announcement in July, 1975, which included IBM 3760 Data Entry Station and the new models of IBM 3270 display stations, and IBM 3790 communication system. ------ 3. IBM 3767 of dot matrix printer IBM 3767 Communication Terminal is a serial printer terminal that employed dot matrix print-head technology and, for the first time, the Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) communications protocol set under IBM's Systems Network Architecture (SNA). It was introduced in 1974 and was used widely during the late 1970s to 1990s, for attachment to IBM System/360 and System/370 mainframe computers and IBM System/7 as an alternative to a 2741 typewriter terminal ------ 4. Macintosh Printer Secrets of dot matrix printer Macintosh Printer Secrets is a 408-page hardcover book written by Larry Pina. It was first published in 1990 by Hayden Books, and is now out of print. The book teaches about dot matrix and ink-jet printers on the Apple Macintosh personal computers.
Knowledge About 3d Printer
Knowledge About 3d Printer
1. Early life and career of 3d printer Jimmy Snyder was born in 1934 in New Brighton, Pennsylvania and soon moved to Wheeling, West Virginia as a young man, working as a coal miner to support his family. His professional music career began at the age of seventeen, when he was invited to play on the local WWVA radio show, "Wheeling Jamboree," in Wheeling, West Virginia. One of the earliest bands that Snyder played in was Toby Stroud and The Blue Mountain Boys. The boys primarily played bluegrass, boasting the talented fiddle player, Toby Stroud, who would soon have a very successful career as a bluegrass fiddler. Toby Stroud and The Blue Mountain Boys enjoyed minor success with their song entitled "Jesse James." Today, the song is recognized as a classic example of early Bluegrass music, oftentimes included on compilation albums. Snyder soon found his way to Los Angeles, California, after his service in the US military. He began playing with the Gene Davis band in the mid-1950s. By 1959, the Gene Davis Band had a regular gig at The Palomino Club of North Hollywood. Snyder began getting recognition, as the band was soon advertised as "The Gene Davis Band featuring Jimmy Snyder." Snyder left the Gene Davis Band in 1961 and found his own gig at the Rag Doll Club, while Gene Davis attempted to replace him with Johnny Paycheck, but Paycheck soon lost the gig and it was given to Jerry Inman. Jimmy Snyder was first signed to country label Toppa Records in the early 1960s. Among other early Toppa artists were Gene Davis, Johnny and Jonie Mosby, Wade Ray, Johnny Dabbs, Kenny Brown, and Lina Lynne. He was briefly signed with K-Ark Records in the late 1960s. In February 1971, K-Ark merged with B.J.B Records of Hollywood and Snyder had releases in the weeks to follow, along with Tony Booth and Bobby Bakersfield. He signed with Wayside Records, where he enjoyed the most commercial success of his career, produced by Little Richie Johnson. It was under Johnson's production that Snyder scored his biggest hit, "The Chicago Story", a song about a soldier's wife seeing him off to war, with a twist ending that was considered to be controversial at the time of the single's release. By the 1970s he was signed with American Heritage Records. In 1972, the Shelby Singleton Corportatio signed a contract with American Heritage Records for exclusive distribution rights. While signed to American Heritage, Snyder's "Candy" reached the country charts. Little Richie Johnson once again produced Snyder on American Heritage Snyder made several film appearances, including the cult classic "Rock All Night" and Clint Eastwood's "Any Which Way You Can". Snyder left California in the 1980s and moved to Nashville, Tennessee, where he played in Printer's Alley, mentoring several aspiring country musicians, including Tim McGraw and Trace Adkins, giving them their first gigs. After playing Printer's Alley, he landed the house gig at Tootsie's World Famous Orchid Lounge, where he plays with the Jimmy Snyder Band. ------ 2. Black Legion of 3d printer Effinger took control in 1931 of the Black Legion; he believed it could be the basis for a network of revolutionary cells. He supported expansion by a military structure of brigades, battalions, etc. and soon advocated a revolution, intending for the Legion to seize power in Washington D.C. and install him as dictator. Effinger described his movement as "a guerrilla army designed to fight the Republican and Democratic parties". He rewrote history, claiming that the Legion dated to the revolutionary-era Boston Tea Party, rather than the 1920s. Under Effinger's vision, the Legion expanded in Ohio and Michigan during the early 1930s of the Great Depression, where a chapter was first founded by Arthur Lupp in Highland Park in 1931. Its membership was similar to those previously attracted to the KKK: white Protestant native-born men, many from the South, who were threatened by immigration and other changes in society; many lacked skills for the industrial jobs of major cities. While Effinger claimed leadership, the chapters were highly independent. The Black Legion members had a long list of enemies: immigrants, Catholics, Jews, blacks, labor organizers, communists, and socialists. The Black Legion was linked in Michigan especially to a handful of racist and political murders as well as attempts to appeal to a wider base of the community by arson and bomb attacks on communist bookshops and labor organizers. The Black Legion expanded even more in Michigan than Ohio, reaching an estimated membership of 20,000 to 30,000 in the mid-1930s, with one third based in Detroit. They were later found to have been particularly influential in Highland Park, Michigan, with a mayor, chief of police, and city councilman as members, among many others. Their network helped members get jobs and exert political influence. In May 1936 Charles Poole, a Catholic Works Progress Administration organizer, was shot and killed in southwest Detroit, Michigan by Legion member Major Dayton Dean after being kidnapped by him and a gang of followers. While crimes against non-whites or communists were often ignored by small-town police at the time, offenses for religious affiliation tended to be taken more seriously. Poole's killers were vigorously pursued by Detroit city police and the Wayne County Prosecutor's office. Dean pleaded guilty and testified against other members of his gang and the Legion; he and ten others were sentenced to life in prison. Investigations resulting from his testimony and public outrage about the group led to convictions of another 37 men for crimes ranging from attempted murder to other murders; they all received prison sentences. With so many leaders jailed, the Black Legion collapsed. ------ 3. Selected bibliography of 3d printer The author is Henri-Jean Martin unless indicated otherwise. Les mtamorphoses du livre. Paris: Albin Michel. c. 2004. ISBN 2-226-14237-1.mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .citation qquotes:"""""""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registrationcolor:#555.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:12px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output code.cs1-codecolor:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errordisplay:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-formatfont-size:95%.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0.2em.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0.2em.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflinkfont-weight:inherit Series : Itinraires du savoir. Jean-Marc Chatelain; et al. (2000). La naissance du livre moderne (XIVe-XVIIe sicles) : mise en page et mise en texte du livre franais. Paris: Editions du Cercle de la librairie. ISBN 2-7654-0776-2. Livre, pouvoirs et socit Paris au XVIIe sicle, 1598-1701 (3d ed.). Geneva: Droz. 1999. ISBN 2-600-00384-3. (set); (v. 1); (v. 2). preface by Roger Chartier ; Series : Titre courant, 1420-5254, 14-15 ; Note : "Ce livre a d'abord paru en 1969 dans la collection Histoire et civilisation du livre." See also: (1969) (same title and publisher, no ISBN) Series : Histoire et civilisation du livre, 3 ; Note : "Publications du Centre de recherches d'histoire et de philologie de la IVe section de l'cole pratique des hautes tudes, Paris." Originally presented as the author's thesis, Paris. Febvre, Lucien; Henri-Jean Martin (1997). The coming of the book : the impact of printing 1450-1800. London: Verso. ISBN 1-85984-108-2. tr. by David Gerard ; ed. by Geoffrey Nowell-Smith and David Wootton ; Note : reprint, other reprints by this publisher 1990 & 1984, originally published (London : N.L.B., 1976) ; Translation of L'apparition du livre. The French book : religion, absolutism, and readership, 1585-1715. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. 1996. ISBN 0-8018-5179-3. Series : Johns Hopkins symposia in comparative history, 22nd. The history and power of writing. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 1994. ISBN 0-226-50835-8. tr. by Lydia G. Cochrane. Print, power, and people in 17th-century France. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press. 1993. ISBN 0-8108-2477-9. tr. by David Gerard ; Note : Translation of Livre, pouvoirs et socit Paris au 17e sicle. Originally presented as the author's thesis, Paris. with Roger Chartier and Jean-Pierre Vivet (1989). Histoire de l'dition franaise. Paris: Fayard-Cercle de la Librairie. ISBN 2-213-02399-9. Check date values in: |year (help) 4 volumes. with Bruno Delmas (1988). Histoire et pouvoirs de l'crit. Paris: Librairie acadmique Perrin. ISBN 2-262-00616-4. Series : Histoire et dcadence, ISSN 0291-3852 ; preface by Pierre Chaunu. Le livre franais sous l'Ancien Rgime. Paris: Promodis/Editions du Cercle de la Librairie. c. 1987. ISBN 2-903181-57-8. Series : Histoire du livre. Pour une histoire du livre : XVe-XVIIIe sicle : cinq confrences. Naples: Bibliopolis. c. 1987. Series : Lezioni della Scuola di studi superiori in Napoli, 8. with Roger Chartier and Jean-Pierre Vivet (c1982). Histoire de l'dition franaise. Paris: Bibliothque Nationale. ISBN 2-903181-06-3. Check date values in: |year (help) 4 volumes. Febvre, Lucien; Henri-Jean Martin (1976). The coming of the book: the impact of printing 1450-1800. N.L.B.: London. ISBN 0-902308-17-3. tr. by David Gerard ; ed. by Geoffrey Nowell-Smith and David Wootton ; Series : Foundations of history library ; Note: Translation of L'apparition du livre Febvre, Lucien; with Henri-Jean Martin (1971). L'apparition du livre par Lucien Febvre et Henri Jean Martin. Avec le concours de Anne Basanoff et al. Paris: Albin Michel. Series : L'volution de l'humanit no. 30; Note : Previously published as v.49 of the Bibliothque de synthse historique "L'evolution de l'humanite". Le Livre et la civilisation crite. Paris: cole nationale suprieure de bibliothcaires. 1968. Histoire du livre. Paris: Bibliothque Nationale. 1964.
Introduction to 3d Printer
Introduction to 3d Printer
1. Protector of Aborigines of 3d printer After arriving in Sydney in November 1838, Sievwright lived briefly with his wife, Christina, and their seven children in Melbourne. The whole family then moved to live among the Aborigines in the Geelong area. This was on the edge of the area assigned to him, known as the Western District, covering about 40,000 square kilometres. British and Irish settlers had begun arriving in the District about three years earlier, but at the time thousands of Aboriginal people still far outnumbered the Europeans. As a Protector of Aborigines, Sievwright was commissioned by the British government to represent the Aboriginal people, and to protect them "from cruelty, oppression and injustice" and "from encroachments upon their property". In February 1841, Sievwright and his family moved further into his district to set up a new camp at Lake Keilambete, near present-day Terang. A year later, he moved to Mt Rouse, near present day Penshurst, again urging the Aborigines of the district to join him. Sievwright's difficulties were considerable, not speaking the languages of the Aborigines under his care, and most of them coming into contact with Europeans for the first time. Nevertheless, at each of his camps he launched limited agricultural training programs in return for food, when traditional food supplies became scarcer as more European settlers arrived with sheep and cattle. At the same time, he launched a series of investigations into the killing of Aboriginal people. His efforts to seek prosecutions of Europeans involved in killings made him extremely unpopular among the white settlers. One squatter recorded in his private journal that by February 1840, Sievwright had already become "the most unpopular man that ever breathed". Around the same time, the Port Phillip Gazette reported that Sievwright was "in very bad odour" with the squatters of the Western District. "These gentlemen, it appears, cut him upon all occasions, and will not suffer him to enter their houses." In August 1842, Sievwright was told that he'd been suspended without pay because of charges against his moral character, dating back to 1839. Port Phillip's Superintendent Charles La Trobe told NSW Governor George Gipps in Sydney that even if the charges against Sievwright were false, they had been "from the outset fatal to him and his recent career". Chief Protector Robinson had already backed a plan to sack Sievwright months earlier. Even before Sievwright learned of his suspension at Mt Rouse, it had been reported in Melbourne by the Port Phillip Gazette. At the same time, the Gazette referred to a threat by the colonial government to refuse squatting licences in part of the Western District where Sievwright had reported the recent murders of three Aboriginal women and a child. "There is still some doubt if the whole affair has not been exaggerated," it said. After it became apparent that Sievwright's suspension was based at least in part on a letter written by his own wife in 1839, both she and their eldest daughter, Frances, wrote to La Trobe defending him.However, Sievwright remained suspended, and the family slipped into poverty. "Mr Sievwright's situation precluded him from making friends among the white population," a man called Frederic Nesbitt wrote to La Trobe. "Therefore they are now suffering the penalty of having done their duty to the Aborigines." Geelong Police Magistrate Nicholas Fenwick confirmed the family's plight, telling the Superintendent: "Nobody here it appears will give them anything on credit now that Mr Sievwright has been suspended, and how they manage to get their daily bread, nobody can tell, and their children are in rags." In London, Secretary of State for War and the Colonies, Edward Smith-Stanley, endorsed Gipps' recommendation that Sievwright be dismissed. "I should wish if possible to avoid pursuing this matter further, as it is not of a character fit for public investigation," he told the Governor. La Trobe and Gipps continued to reject Sievwright's demands for a full inquiry into the allegations that had led to his dismissal. They agreed only to two inquiries into subsequent claims raised in 1844 that he'd misappropriated government stores. Sievwright told La Trobe he regretted to state that Chief Protector Robinson was his "openly declared enemy", and was withholding documentary evidence that would show the claims had no basis. To further try to clear his name, Sievwright wrote a lengthy letter to the Geelong Advertiser, the voice of the Western District squatters. Over two days in February 1845, it devoted four broadsheet pages to Sievwright's letter. It incorporated correspondence relating to the Protectorate, his views on what he viewed as its maladministration by Robinson, and the failure of La Trobe to grant his demand for a full inquiry into his dismissal. "We cannot see a man crushed, as Mr Sievwright has been, without crying 'shame'. We confess that until these disclosures were made, we always entertained a strong prejudice against Mr Sievwright, and did not scruple to express it, and we are therefore glad of the opportunity to make reparation," the Advertiser commented. In May 1845, Sievwright sailed from Melbourne to London, leaving his family in Melbourne, to put his case for an inquiry direct to the British government. He was still trying unsuccessfully at least as late as 1849. ------ 2. Selected bibliography of 3d printer The author is Henri-Jean Martin unless indicated otherwise. Les mtamorphoses du livre. Paris: Albin Michel. c. 2004. ISBN 2-226-14237-1.mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .citation qquotes:"""""""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registrationcolor:#555.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:12px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output code.cs1-codecolor:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errordisplay:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-formatfont-size:95%.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0.2em.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0.2em.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflinkfont-weight:inherit Series : Itinraires du savoir. Jean-Marc Chatelain; et al. (2000). La naissance du livre moderne (XIVe-XVIIe sicles) : mise en page et mise en texte du livre franais. Paris: Editions du Cercle de la librairie. ISBN 2-7654-0776-2. Livre, pouvoirs et socit Paris au XVIIe sicle, 1598-1701 (3d ed.). Geneva: Droz. 1999. ISBN 2-600-00384-3. (set); (v. 1); (v. 2). preface by Roger Chartier ; Series : Titre courant, 1420-5254, 14-15 ; Note : "Ce livre a d'abord paru en 1969 dans la collection Histoire et civilisation du livre." See also: (1969) (same title and publisher, no ISBN) Series : Histoire et civilisation du livre, 3 ; Note : "Publications du Centre de recherches d'histoire et de philologie de la IVe section de l'cole pratique des hautes tudes, Paris." Originally presented as the author's thesis, Paris. Febvre, Lucien; Henri-Jean Martin (1997). The coming of the book : the impact of printing 1450-1800. London: Verso. ISBN 1-85984-108-2. tr. by David Gerard ; ed. by Geoffrey Nowell-Smith and David Wootton ; Note : reprint, other reprints by this publisher 1990 & 1984, originally published (London : N.L.B., 1976) ; Translation of L'apparition du livre. The French book : religion, absolutism, and readership, 1585-1715. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. 1996. ISBN 0-8018-5179-3. Series : Johns Hopkins symposia in comparative history, 22nd. The history and power of writing. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 1994. ISBN 0-226-50835-8. tr. by Lydia G. Cochrane. Print, power, and people in 17th-century France. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press. 1993. ISBN 0-8108-2477-9. tr. by David Gerard ; Note : Translation of Livre, pouvoirs et socit Paris au 17e sicle. Originally presented as the author's thesis, Paris. with Roger Chartier and Jean-Pierre Vivet (1989). Histoire de l'dition franaise. Paris: Fayard-Cercle de la Librairie. ISBN 2-213-02399-9. Check date values in: |year (help) 4 volumes. with Bruno Delmas (1988). Histoire et pouvoirs de l'crit. Paris: Librairie acadmique Perrin. ISBN 2-262-00616-4. Series : Histoire et dcadence, ISSN 0291-3852 ; preface by Pierre Chaunu. Le livre franais sous l'Ancien Rgime. Paris: Promodis/Editions du Cercle de la Librairie. c. 1987. ISBN 2-903181-57-8. Series : Histoire du livre. Pour une histoire du livre : XVe-XVIIIe sicle : cinq confrences. Naples: Bibliopolis. c. 1987. Series : Lezioni della Scuola di studi superiori in Napoli, 8. with Roger Chartier and Jean-Pierre Vivet (c1982). Histoire de l'dition franaise. Paris: Bibliothque Nationale. ISBN 2-903181-06-3. Check date values in: |year (help) 4 volumes. Febvre, Lucien; Henri-Jean Martin (1976). The coming of the book: the impact of printing 1450-1800. N.L.B.: London. ISBN 0-902308-17-3. tr. by David Gerard ; ed. by Geoffrey Nowell-Smith and David Wootton ; Series : Foundations of history library ; Note: Translation of L'apparition du livre Febvre, Lucien; with Henri-Jean Martin (1971). L'apparition du livre par Lucien Febvre et Henri Jean Martin. Avec le concours de Anne Basanoff et al. Paris: Albin Michel. Series : L'volution de l'humanit no. 30; Note : Previously published as v.49 of the Bibliothque de synthse historique "L'evolution de l'humanite". Le Livre et la civilisation crite. Paris: cole nationale suprieure de bibliothcaires. 1968. Histoire du livre. Paris: Bibliothque Nationale. 1964.
Introduction to Printer & Photocopier
Introduction to Printer & Photocopier
1. William Day (lithographer) of printer & photocopier William Day snr (17971845) was a lithographer and watercolour artist in partnership with Louis Haghe, forming the lithographic firm of Day & Haghe, famous in early Victorian London. The firm printed lithographs dealing with an enormous variety of topics, including hunting scenes, topographical views and genre images. Their work was so technically superior that in 1838, they were appointed 'Lithographers to the Queen.' His son William Day jnr is recorded as being 27 years in the 1851 census and with the occupation of copperplate engraver and printer, living at 19 Lorraine Place, Islington, married to Elizabeth Rees (24 years old) from Gloucester, and with 2 sons William J. (2 yrs) and James R. (1 yr). Appearing in the same census record is William Day jnr's elder sister Caroline A Nicholls (30 years) married to John R Nicholls (38 years). William Day snr probably had a second son, John Bellence Day, who in 1854 married a Rose Isabel Rees, sister of Elizabeth. Rose shows up in the 1861 census in Claines, Worcestershire as a visitor from Buenos Aires and married to a lithographer. The 1881 census has Caroline Nicholls staying with Dr. W.G. Grace and his wife Agnes Nicholls Day, her niece, the daughter of William Day jnr., who was also W.G. Grace's first cousin. ------ 2. Jos Vizinho of printer & photocopier Jos Vizinho, (also known in English as Joseph Vecinho), was a Portuguese Jew, born in the town of Covilh, court physician and scientist at the end of the fifteenth century. He was a pupil of Abraham Zacuto, under whom he studied mathematics and cosmography, on which latter subject he was regarded as an eminent authority by John II of Portugal. He was sent by the king to the coast of Guinea, there to measure the altitude of the sun, doubtless by means of the astrolabe as improved by Jacob ben Machir. When, in 1484, Christopher Columbus laid before the king his plan for a western route to the Indies, it was submitted to a junta, or commission, consisting of the Bishop of Ceuta, "Mestre Jos" (Jos Vizinho), the court physician Rodrigo, a Jewish mathematician named Moiss, and Martin Behaim. The junta finally decided against Columbus' plans; and when the matter came up before the council of state Pedro de Menezes opposed them also, basing his arguments upon Jos Vizinho's criticisms. Though Vizinho did not favor Columbus, the latter had personal intercourse with him, and obtained from him a translation of Zacuto's astronomical tables. Columbus carried this translation with him on his voyage, and found it extremely useful; it was found in his library after his death. Jos Vizinho's translation of Zacuto's tables was published by the Jewish printer Samuel d'Ortas in Leiria under the title "Almanach Perpetuum," 1496. ------ 3. John Morton (trade unionist) of printer & photocopier John Morton (born 1925) is a trade unionist and former musician. Born in Wolverhampton, Morton learned to play the piano while he was a child. On leaving school, he started an apprenticeship as a printer, but his love of swing music led him to leave to play in a band. He joined the Musicians' Union, and gradually rose to prominence, winning election to its Executive Committee, and leading a boycott of Wolverhampton's Scala Ballroom over its policy of only admitting white people. Morton worked full-time for the union for a few years, but moved to become a lecturer in industrial relations at Solihull College. Despite this, he remained on the Executive Committee and, when General Secretary Hardie Ratcliffe announced his retiral, he asked Morton to run for the post. Morton won election as general secretary, focusing much of his time on opposing the closure of orchestras, and negotiating with broadcasters, particularly the new independent local radio stations. He also became President of the International Federation of Musicians (FIM). He was elected to the General Council of the Trades Union Congress, serving from 1975 to 1985, and again from 1986 until his retirement. Politically, he was considered to have moved from the left-wing of the union to the centre or right during this period. Morton retired as general secretary in 1990, but remained president of the FIM until 2002, and president emeritus of the FIM thereafter. ------ 4. Charles Troedel of printer & photocopier Charles Troedel (1835/6 Hamburg 1906) (born Johannes Thedor Carl Troedel) was a German-born lithographic printer prominent in Melbourne during the late 19th century. He was apprenticed to his father at the age 13 and at the age of 24, emigrated to Melbourne, arriving in Williamstown on board the Great Britain in 1860. Trading as Troedel & Co, and from 1910 Troedel & Cooper, his company had close links with many well-known artists of that era. One of his apprentices was Arthur Streeton who was still working for him before being discovered by Tom Roberts and Frederick McCubbin. His name was well known in the printing industry for over 100 years. In 1863, Franois Cogn convinced Troedel that a book of Melbourne views would be a financial success. This artwork was ultimately published as 12 monthly subscriptions of 2 views per month and known as the Melbourne Views. A bound copy of the full 24 views is held in the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. Troedel carried out the lithography for Ferdinand von Mueller's landmark work Eucalyptographia. A descriptive atlas of the eucalypts of Australia and the adjoining islands published between 1879 and 1884. A handsomely illustrated volume of Troedle's work was published in 2020 (Printed on Stone: The Lithographs of Charles Troedel By Amanda Scardamaglia, Melbourne Books). ------ 5. Bibliography of printer & photocopier Loughnan, Robert Andrew (1929). The Remarkable Life Story of Sir Joseph Ward: 40 Years a Liberal. New Century Press.mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .citation qquotes:"""""""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green. svg/9px-Lock-green. svg. png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration abackground-image:url("//upload. wikimedia. org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2. svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2. svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2. svg. png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right . 1em center. mw-parser-output . cs1-subscription,. mw-parser-output . cs1-registrationcolor:#555. mw-parser-output . cs1-subscription span,. mw-parser-output . cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo. svg/12px-Wikisource-logo. svg. png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:12px;background-position:right . 1em center. mw-parser-output code. cs1-codecolor:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errordisplay:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0. 3em. mw-parser-output . cs1-subscription,. mw-parser-output . cs1-registration,. mw-parser-output . cs1-formatfont-size:95%. mw-parser-output . cs1-kern-left,. mw-parser-output . cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0. 2em. mw-parser-output . cs1-kern-right,. mw-parser-output . cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0. 2em. mw-parser-output . citation . mw-selflinkfont-weight:inherit. ------ 6. William Henry Wesley of printer & photocopier William Henry Wesley (18411922) was an engraver, artist, astronomer and administrator, who worked as assistant secretary of the Royal Astronomical Society from 1875 to his death in 1922. Wesley was born at Stapenhill, Staffordshire, England, the son of a printer and publisher. He moved with his family to London in 1855, and became an apprentice to an engraver. He developed a reputation as a skilled technical artist, preparing and engraving diagrams for scientific publications. Wesley was asked by the astronomer Arthur Cowper Ranyard to prepare an engraving of the Sun's corona from photographs of the 1871 total solar eclipse. When the position of assistant secretary to the Royal Astronomical Society became vacant, Cowper Raynard pushed Wesley to apply. Wesley was appointed. The assistant secretary was the society's primary administrative official. William Henry Wesley reorganised and updated the administration of the society. He prepared a catalogue of its extensive library. He travelled to Algiers to observe the total solar eclipse of 28 May 1900. He concluded that photography was capable of recording more detail in the Sun's corona than could be seen visually through a telescope. Wesley prepared diagrams for scientific publications. This included charts of the Milky Way and maps of the Moon's surface. Wesley was an author of articles in the Dictionary of National Biography, including the short one about the astronomer Arthur Cowper Ranyard. ------ 7. Edward Wakefield (New Zealand politician) of printer & photocopier Felix Edward Wakefield (22 May 1845 10 August 1924) was the son of Felix Wakefield, one of Edward Gibbon Wakefields younger brothers. Edward was born in Launceston, Tasmania, brought up in New Zealand, and educated in France and at King's College London. He married Agnes Mildred Hall on 15 July 1874 at Christchurch. She was the daughter of George Williamson Hall, and John Hall was thus her uncle. Edward and Agnes had four children: Edward Howard St George Wakefield (1875); Gerald Seymour Wakefield (1877); Grace Josephine Wakefield (1879); and Mildred Wakefield (1881). Wakefield was a journalist and then a colourful, volatile and ambitious politician in New Zealand, who showed considerable promise, though this was not quite fulfilled; "He was among the best parliamentary debaters of the time; admired for his wit and power of argument." He was the Member of Parliament for Geraldine 18751881, then for Selwyn 18841887, when he resigned. He won an 1884 by-election against John McLachlan, and was then elected unopposed in 1884 general election some five months later. He served as Colonial Secretary in the short 1884 ministry of Harry Atkinson; from 28 August to 3 September 1884. Wakefield subsequently concentrated on writing, producing New Zealand after Fifty Years (1889). Later he moved to America, then London. Having become blind in old age, he was made a brother of the Charterhouse in recognition of his service, and resided there at the almshouse; he died there in 1924.
Knowledge About Printer & Photocopier
Knowledge About Printer & Photocopier
1. John Morton (trade unionist) of printer & photocopier John Morton (born 1925) is a trade unionist and former musician. Born in Wolverhampton, Morton learned to play the piano while he was a child. On leaving school, he started an apprenticeship as a printer, but his love of swing music led him to leave to play in a band. He joined the Musicians' Union, and gradually rose to prominence, winning election to its Executive Committee, and leading a boycott of Wolverhampton's Scala Ballroom over its policy of only admitting white people. Morton worked full-time for the union for a few years, but moved to become a lecturer in industrial relations at Solihull College. Despite this, he remained on the Executive Committee and, when General Secretary Hardie Ratcliffe announced his retiral, he asked Morton to run for the post. Morton won election as general secretary, focusing much of his time on opposing the closure of orchestras, and negotiating with broadcasters, particularly the new independent local radio stations. He also became President of the International Federation of Musicians (FIM). He was elected to the General Council of the Trades Union Congress, serving from 1975 to 1985, and again from 1986 until his retirement. Politically, he was considered to have moved from the left-wing of the union to the centre or right during this period. Morton retired as general secretary in 1990, but remained president of the FIM until 2002, and president emeritus of the FIM thereafter. ------ 2. Jos Vizinho of printer & photocopier Jos Vizinho, (also known in English as Joseph Vecinho), was a Portuguese Jew, born in the town of Covilh, court physician and scientist at the end of the fifteenth century. He was a pupil of Abraham Zacuto, under whom he studied mathematics and cosmography, on which latter subject he was regarded as an eminent authority by John II of Portugal. He was sent by the king to the coast of Guinea, there to measure the altitude of the sun, doubtless by means of the astrolabe as improved by Jacob ben Machir. When, in 1484, Christopher Columbus laid before the king his plan for a western route to the Indies, it was submitted to a junta, or commission, consisting of the Bishop of Ceuta, "Mestre Jos" (Jos Vizinho), the court physician Rodrigo, a Jewish mathematician named Moiss, and Martin Behaim. The junta finally decided against Columbus' plans; and when the matter came up before the council of state Pedro de Menezes opposed them also, basing his arguments upon Jos Vizinho's criticisms. Though Vizinho did not favor Columbus, the latter had personal intercourse with him, and obtained from him a translation of Zacuto's astronomical tables. Columbus carried this translation with him on his voyage, and found it extremely useful; it was found in his library after his death. Jos Vizinho's translation of Zacuto's tables was published by the Jewish printer Samuel d'Ortas in Leiria under the title "Almanach Perpetuum," 1496. ------ 3. Notable works of printer & photocopier Historical records of New South WalesBladen, F. M. (Frank Murcott), ed. (1893), Historical records of New South Wales, Volume 1, Part 1Cook, 1762-1780, Sydney: Charles Potter, Government Printer, OL 20445908M.mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .citation qquotes:"""""""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registrationcolor:#555.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:12px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output code.cs1-codecolor:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errordisplay:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-formatfont-size:95%.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0.2em.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0.2em.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflinkfont-weight:inherit Bladen, F. M. (Frank Murcott), ed. (1892), Historical records of New South Wales, Facsimiles of charts to accompany Volume 1, Part 1Cook, 1762-1780, Sydney: Charles Potter, Government Printer, OL 26242827M Bladen, F. M. (Frank Murcott), ed. (1892), Historical records of New South Wales, Volume 1, Part 2Phillip, 1783-1792, Sydney: Charles Potter, Government Printer, OL 26242838M Bladen, F. M. (Frank Murcott), ed. (1893), Historical records of New South Wales, Volume 2Grose and Paterson, 1793-1795, Sydney: Charles Potter, Government Printer Bladen, F. M. (Frank Murcott), ed. (1895), Historical records of New South Wales, Volume 3Hunter, 17961799, Sydney: Charles Potter, Government Printer, OL 20445904M Bladen, F. M. (Frank Murcott), ed. (1896), Historical records of New South Wales, Volume 4Hunter and King, 1801,1802,1803, Sydney: Charles Potter, Government Printer, OL 20445905M Bladen, F. M. (Frank Murcott), ed. (1897), Historical records of New South Wales, Volume 5King, 1803-1805, Sydney: Charles Potter, Government Printer, OL 3048032M Bladen, F. M. (Frank Murcott), ed. (1898), Historical records of New South Wales, Volume 6King and Bligh, 1806-1807, 1808, Sydney: William Applegate Gullick, Government Printer, OL 20531287M Bladen, F. M. (Frank Murcott), ed. (1901), Historical records of New South Wales, Volume 7Bligh and Macquarie, 1809, 1810, 1811, Sydney: William Applegate Gullick, Government Printer, OL 26242863M ------ 4. Bibliography of printer & photocopier Loughnan, Robert Andrew (1929). The Remarkable Life Story of Sir Joseph Ward: 40 Years a Liberal. New Century Press.mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .citation qquotes:"""""""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green. svg/9px-Lock-green. svg. png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration abackground-image:url("//upload. wikimedia. org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2. svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2. svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2. svg. png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right . 1em center. mw-parser-output . cs1-subscription,. mw-parser-output . cs1-registrationcolor:#555. mw-parser-output . cs1-subscription span,. mw-parser-output . cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo. svg/12px-Wikisource-logo. svg. png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:12px;background-position:right . 1em center. mw-parser-output code. cs1-codecolor:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errordisplay:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0. 3em. mw-parser-output . cs1-subscription,. mw-parser-output . cs1-registration,. mw-parser-output . cs1-formatfont-size:95%. mw-parser-output . cs1-kern-left,. mw-parser-output . cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0. 2em. mw-parser-output . cs1-kern-right,. mw-parser-output . cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0. 2em. mw-parser-output . citation . mw-selflinkfont-weight:inherit.
Knowledge About All-in-one Printer
Knowledge About All-in-one Printer
1. Background of all-in-one printer Early lifeLemma was born on February 13, 1928, in one of woredas in Oromia Region called Ada'a from his father Guya Gemeda and his mother Mare Gobena. At his early age he was obligated to became a cattle herder for his parents were pastoral. By his leisure time he was painting on the wall of his family's house, and he became a mesmerizing icon for his family. He told that her mother's craft works inspired him in childhood to became a painter. As his painting career grew well, people from surroundings positively influenced his father Guya to sent his son, Lemma, school. By the age of 14, in 1942, Lemma went to "Lebna Dengel primary school" which is about 10 Kilometre far from his hometown. Lemma had a great ambition to change the socio economic status of his poor family. For this he was aimed to join Teachers Training College. In 1950, Lemma went to Nazareth Teachers Training College, but not stayed longer over there. For it take seven years to got graduated, Lemma left the college and went to his home-land, and painting. Lemma not became idle, he was fighting to change his parents socio economic status. When he was in this situation, he had informed that Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia used to come Debrezeth in every weekend. Then Lemma decided to went to Debrezeth and show the portraits of a new model of Airplane. He got a chance to show his work, and the Majesty was become surprised by Lemma's work and sent him to Ethiopian Air Force for training. He was trained as Airplane Technician and graduated with a great destination in 1954. Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia also congratulated Lemma and gifted him with a painting materials. Then he was sent to Asmara Air Force (when Eretria was under Ethiopia) as a teacher. Becoming a teacher for Air Force, not distracted his talent. He was continued to learn painting in Italian Painting School which was in Asmara, Ethiopia by his own wage. After 11 year ago, in 1963, Lemma returned back to his home-town. CareerLemma was begun to translate a book that gifted to him from many foreigners after Asmara's return, among them "Sil yale astemari" was the first one. By the time no modernized printing machine nationally, Lemma became a good printer to multiply and distribute colorfully painted portraits of Ethiopian nations and nationalities', specially Oromo people. Among his notable work 'Kuwanta' was become very meaningful. On this portrait, Lemma tried to glimpse the Africa's natural resource corruption. On this portrait there are 2 cats those are looking on a meat that hung on horizontally tied rope. AwardsLemma's paintings have been exhibited and sold successfully in America, Sweden, United Kingdom, Nigeria, Kenya and Senegal and let him to won numerous prizes and awards. Lemma awarded as "A man who is an author of notable work which glimpse three generation" by Native American Heritage Association. For his contribution to the society of Oromia the University of Jimma also awarded him with Honorary Doctorate. ------ 2. Models of all-in-one printer The first model under the GAI is the negative income tax (NIT). Negative income tax works on the assumption that families who earn below the low-income threshold should receive aid in the form of direct grants rather than paying taxes. This allows heads of a family unit to use their financial resources as they best see fit rather than being constrained by the traditional income assistance programs, which typically have means tests, time limits and other restrictions. Experiments using the negative income tax model have been completed in the United States in the late 1960s through the early 1970s. The NIT model was also tested in Canada in the 1970s in Manitoba; it was called the Mincome experiment. It allowed every participating family unit to receive a minimum cash benefit, with every dollar over the benefit amount taxed at 60%. The results showed a modest impact on labor markets, with family working hours decreasing 5%. These potential economic costs can be offset by the opportunity cost of working. The opportunity cost of working more is spending less time with their families and on education. Mothers spent more time rearing newborns, and the educational impacts are regarded as a success. Students in these families showed higher test scores and lower dropout rates. There was also an increase in adults doing continuing education. The second model that falls under the guaranteed annual income concept is the unconditional basic income also known as the universal demogrant (UD) model. This is a payment to all persons regardless of income. It is usually favored by those who see the GAI as a right of citizenship and whose belief in the goal of decreasing poverty through providing the basic income and more equally sharing the economic benefits of society. ------ 3. Life of all-in-one printer Reading was born in New Jersey. He came across country to California with Samuel J. Hensley as a member of the Chiles-Walker party in 1843. In 1844, Reading entered the service of General Sutter as a clerk, explorer, and chief of trappers. He received the 26,632-acre (10,778 ha) Mexican land grant Rancho Buena Ventura in 1844 for the area occupied by today's Redding, California, and Cottonwood, California, along the Sacramento River. In the Winter of 184445, while Sutter was marching with about one hundred men to join Governor Michaeltorena, Pierson was in command at Sutters Fort. In 1846, Reading was a participant in the Bear Flag Revolt. In the MexicanAmerican War, Reading enlisted under Fremont and was appointed Paymaster of the California Battalion, with the rank of Major. In 1848 Reading was among the first to visit James W. Marshall's gold discovery in Coloma, California and shortly after engaged extensively in prospecting for gold in Shasta County, and along the Trinity River. In the fall of 1849, Major Reading fitted out an expedition to discover the bay into which he supposed the Trinity and Klamath Rivers must empty. From 1849 to 1850, Reading operated a store in Sacramento with Samuel J. Hensley and Jacob R. Snyder. He was the Whig candidate for Governor of California in 1851. In 1854 Reading went to Washington, D.C. for the US Supreme Court hearing on his land grant claim. There he met and married Fanny Wallace Washington. Reading returned to his Rancho Buena Ventura in Shasta County in 1856, where he remained until his death in 1868. ------ 4. Works of all-in-one printer Lee was a noted scholar, and studied astrology, but then destroyed the books and manuscripts that he had collected. on the subject. He continued the Theatrum Historicum of Helvicus from 1629 (Oxford edition, 1651). For the sixth edition (Oxford, 1662) he further supplied a treatise De Antiquitate Academi Oxoniensis, and Tractatulus ad Periodum Julianum spectans, both in the name of the printer H. Hall, and continued the work to that year. His Chronicum Cestren was published in Daniel King's Vale Royal of England, London, 1656. Other works by Lee were: Orbis Miraculum, or the Temple of Solomon, London, 1659, 1665, printed at the expense of the university of Oxford. This book was plagiarised by Christopher Kelly, who reproduced the last part as Solomon's Temple spiritualized at Dublin in 1803. It was again published as Kelly's in 1820, at Philadelphia. De Excidio Anti-christi, 1659. What means may be used towards the Conversion of our Carnal Relations? London, 1661; in Samuel Annesley's Morning Exercises, 1677 and 1844. Contemplations on Mortality, London, 1669. The Visibility of the True Church, in Nathanael Vincent's Morning Exercises, 1675; Annesley, 1845. How to manage Secret Prayer, in Annesley's Supplement, 1676 and 1844. The Triumph of Mercy, London, 1677; Boston, 1718. Ecclesia Gemens (anon.), London, 1677, 1678, 1679. Israel Redux, London, 1677, 1678, 1679, including a hitherto unpublished essay on the Ten Tribes by Giles Fletcher. The Joy of Faith, Boston, 1687; London, 1689.After Lee's death appeared The Great Day of Judgment, an assize sermon, Boston, 1692, 1694, 1696. He published a collection of thirty sermons by John Rowe, under the title of Emmanuel, or the Love of Christ, London, 1680. Lee has been identified as the "S. L." who wrote the preface to Thomas Mall's History of the Martyrs epitomised.
Introduction to All-in-one Printer
Introduction to All-in-one Printer
1. Background of all-in-one printer Early lifeLemma was born on February 13, 1928, in one of woredas in Oromia Region called Ada'a from his father Guya Gemeda and his mother Mare Gobena. At his early age he was obligated to became a cattle herder for his parents were pastoral. By his leisure time he was painting on the wall of his family's house, and he became a mesmerizing icon for his family. He told that her mother's craft works inspired him in childhood to became a painter. As his painting career grew well, people from surroundings positively influenced his father Guya to sent his son, Lemma, school. By the age of 14, in 1942, Lemma went to "Lebna Dengel primary school" which is about 10 Kilometre far from his hometown. Lemma had a great ambition to change the socio economic status of his poor family. For this he was aimed to join Teachers Training College. In 1950, Lemma went to Nazareth Teachers Training College, but not stayed longer over there. For it take seven years to got graduated, Lemma left the college and went to his home-land, and painting. Lemma not became idle, he was fighting to change his parents socio economic status. When he was in this situation, he had informed that Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia used to come Debrezeth in every weekend. Then Lemma decided to went to Debrezeth and show the portraits of a new model of Airplane. He got a chance to show his work, and the Majesty was become surprised by Lemma's work and sent him to Ethiopian Air Force for training. He was trained as Airplane Technician and graduated with a great destination in 1954. Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia also congratulated Lemma and gifted him with a painting materials. Then he was sent to Asmara Air Force (when Eretria was under Ethiopia) as a teacher. Becoming a teacher for Air Force, not distracted his talent. He was continued to learn painting in Italian Painting School which was in Asmara, Ethiopia by his own wage. After 11 year ago, in 1963, Lemma returned back to his home-town. CareerLemma was begun to translate a book that gifted to him from many foreigners after Asmara's return, among them "Sil yale astemari" was the first one. By the time no modernized printing machine nationally, Lemma became a good printer to multiply and distribute colorfully painted portraits of Ethiopian nations and nationalities', specially Oromo people. Among his notable work 'Kuwanta' was become very meaningful. On this portrait, Lemma tried to glimpse the Africa's natural resource corruption. On this portrait there are 2 cats those are looking on a meat that hung on horizontally tied rope. AwardsLemma's paintings have been exhibited and sold successfully in America, Sweden, United Kingdom, Nigeria, Kenya and Senegal and let him to won numerous prizes and awards. Lemma awarded as "A man who is an author of notable work which glimpse three generation" by Native American Heritage Association. For his contribution to the society of Oromia the University of Jimma also awarded him with Honorary Doctorate. ------ 2. History of all-in-one printer William Aberhart, Premier of Alberta, was inspired by Major C. H. Douglas Social Credit theory and tried to implement a basic income for Albertans during the 1930s. However, he was thwarted in his attempts by the Federal Government of the time. In 1970 the Canadian Department of National Health and Welfare issued a white paper which both emphasized the ability of NIT to decrease poverty but at the potential expense of decreased work incentive. Specifically, the white paper stated: An overall guaranteed income program.worthy of consideration must offer a substantial level of benefit to people who are normally in the labour market. Therefore a great deal of further study and investigation, is needed to find out what effects such a program would have on people's motivation and on their incentives to work and save. Until these questions are answered, the fear of its impact on productivity will be the main deterrent to the introduction of a general overall guaranteed income plan. (p. 126)Following this stance, the National Council of Welfare advocated in 1976 for the implementation of the guaranteed annual income in Canada. In order to determine real-life responses to NIT implementation, the US government undertook four income maintenance experiments; they transpired in New Jersey and Pennsylvania (19681972), rural areas of North Carolina and Iowa (197072), Seattle and Denver (197078), and Gary Indiana (19711974). These prospective large-scale field studies were truly remarkable due to their size and the fact that families were randomized to either an experimental arm (i.e., NIT) or control arm (usual tax practice). Three major objectives of these interventions were to measure the labour supply response of NIT recipients, understand the effect of varying the base guarantee level and tax rate, and to make a better estimate of the cost of implementing such a program. MincomeIn Canada, an analogous experiment called Mincome took place in Winnipeg and Dauphin, Manitoba, between 1974 and 1979. Importantly, the city of Dauphin served as a saturation site, since all 10,000 community members were eligible to participate (the elderly and disabled were exempt from the four American NIT experiments); four foci of Mincome were an economic arm (examining labour response), a sociologic research division (examining the family formation and community cohesion), an administrative programme, and a statistical division. Unfortunately, the ambitious project ran into significant budgetary problems early on and neither the newly elected Progressive Conservative government in Ottawa nor the Tory government in Manitoba felt strongly about providing further funding. As stated by Hum and Simpson: The original budget of $17 million was never more than a wild guess and, in the event, proved far inadequate. The inflationary price increases of the 1970s, coupled with a larger than anticipated unemployment rate, meant that the proportion of the total going to programme expenses exceeded estimates and was not under the control of the researchers. (p. 44)Ultimately the Dauphin data which was collected at great expense to the taxpayers and time from participants (in the first social experiment ever conducted in Canada) remains largely unexamined. However, some of the participant interviews were released and provide support for the efficacy of NIT. For instance, Amy Richardson, a mother of six whose husband was disabled said: It was enough to bring your income up to where it should be. It was enough to add some cream to the coffee. Everybody was the same so there was no shame. (p.25)Doreen Henderson, a stay at home mother whose husband worked as a janitor also appreciated the benefits of NIT; she said: Give them enough money to raise their kids. People work hard, and it's still not enough. This isn't welfare. This is making sure kids have enough to eat.They should have kept it (NIT). It made a real difference. (p.26)In general, the average reduction in workforce in the US sites was about 13%, with most of the reduction in labour from secondary (typically the wives) and tertiary (typically older children) earners as opposed to the primary earner (usually the husbands). In Mincome the reduction in work effort was more modest: 1% for men and 3% for wives. It is important to remember that when the experiments were conducted, it was less socially acceptable for women to work outside the home. According to Rossi and Lyall only 40% of wives who participated in the experiment worked outside the home and their earning power was low due to limited and discontinuous work experience. As such, the authors contend that wives' labour involvement was marginal and when faced with competing tasks of looking after the household and raising children, the additional income provided by NIT was sufficient to justify an exit from the labor market. However, this phenomenon was predominantly observed in Caucasian wives whereas African American and Hispanic women exhibited a small increase in labor force participation. The decrease in labor involvement of teenage children was correlated to higher rates of high school graduation. A potential explanation is that the additional income from government assistance meant that young adults could stay in school as opposed to joining the workforce in order to support their families. This has the potential positive long-term effect of allowing youth to find higher-wage employment. In summary, the work supply response to NIT was very complex; however, data from the American studies would argue against a dramatic decline in the labour force. Basic income in Canada today (2010)As of 2014, the Liberal Party of Canada, the New Democratic Party (NDP), the Green Party of Canada, the Pirate Party of Canada, provincial party Qubec Solidaire and former conservative senator Hugh Segal advocate for basic income in Canada. Mike Redmond, leader of the New Democratic Party of Prince Edward Island, supports a basic income pilot project in Prince Edward Island. In November 2013, a poll commissioned by the Trudeau Foundation found that 46% of Canadians favoured and 42% opposed replacing current economic assistance with a guaranteed national income. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced a new trial in March 2016. Ontario 2017 Basic Income Pilot ProjectIn Ontario's Basic Income Pilot Project had a budget of $150,000,000, the 4,000 participants received up to $16,989 per year for a single person, less 50% of any earned income $24,027 per year for a couple, less 50% of any earned income, in monthly installments. Although the incoming Progressive Conservative government had promised to maintain the three-year pilot program, its cancellation was announced in August 2018, 10 months after the previous Liberal administration started distributing payments. Minister of Children and Youth Services Lisa MacLeod said the decision was taken due to high costs, and because ministry staff indicated that "the program didn't help people become 'independent contributors' to the economy.". In fact, most anecdotal reports in the popular press do not indicate that entrepreneurship was a preferred goal for participants, (although one anecdotal report described a couple who kept their existing business afloat with the program's payments). About 70% of participants were already employed when entering the program, in low-paid positions which made it difficult to pay expenses such as rent and food. Journalistic reports tended to focus on non-entrepreneurial participant outcomes contributing to personal stability, such as augmenting disability payments, paying for education and student loans, purchasing new eyeglasses while remaining in a low-paid museum job, paying for transportation costs (such as bus fare to work rather than walking for an hour and a half), and purchasing necessary items as fresh produce, hospital parking passes, "winter clothes they couldn't previously afford and staying warm", etc. Anti-poverty groups were "stunned" by the decision to discontinue the program. The Ontario Coalition Against Poverty declared that the decision "demonstrates a reckless disregard for the lives of nearly 4,000 people." Local politicians in Hamilton passed a resolution "denouncing" discontinuation of the program. In contrast, from the viewpoint of the current government, this basic income pilot program is considered an ineffective use of resources, because the first priority for addressing poverty needs to be getting all residents off of welfare rolls and into employment, not providing assistance to people who are already working. Research into effective interventions for individuals suffering poverty and insecurity as a result of low-paid or precarious employment can be challenging, and researcher Kwame McKenzie noted that it is not easy to get 6,000 people to participate in a study. Ending the study early will make it difficult to gather conclusive data regarding the research goal of determining "what happens when low-wage, precarious workers receive a financial top-up." One op-ed writer opined that the study was being ended early due to fears that the results would show that the program worked. Payments concluded in March 2019.
Introduction to Photo Printer
Introduction to Photo Printer
1. 1900s of Photo printer 1900 - The Balmain New Ferry Company (formed 1892) takes over the Balmain Steam Ferry Company (formed 1882). The Balmain New Ferry Company, with naval architect Walter Reeks develops double-ended screw ferries with single screws pushing the vessel in one direction and pulling it in the other. This single "push-pull" configuration is seen in the timber "Lady-class" vessels.1 January 1901 - The North Shore Steam Ferry Company is renamed Sydney Ferries Limited. It goes on to adsorb most of Sydney's ferry services, acquiring the Parramatta River Company in 1901, the New Balmain Ferry Company in 1917, and the Watsons Bay Ferry Company in 1920. Between 1900 and 1922, Sydney Ferries Limited will also acquire 25 large ferryboats, predominantly the "K-class" ferries. Such is the growth in demand for cross-harbour ferries prior to the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, Sydney Ferries Limited becomes the world's largest ferry operator by fleet size and patronage.1901 - Sydney Ferries Limited takes over the Parramatta River service with its acquisition of the Parramatta River Steamers and Tramway Co. Ltd.1901 - Increasing demand on the vehicular ferry service from Milsons Point to Bennelong Point sees the Blues Point to Dawes Point vehicular service re-established.1901 - The Walter Reeks designed Kuring-gai enters service on the Manly run. A steel, double-ended screw steamer, in appearance, size and capacity she will become the archetype of the familiar Manly ferries of the twentieth century.1903 - The City terminus for Parramatta and Lane Cove River ferries is moved from Darling Harbour to number 6/7 jetty at Circular Quay. Jetties 4 and 5 are rebuilt for all North Shore services.1905 - Sydney Ferries Limited begins services to Clifton Gardens, Balmoral, and The Spit.early 1906 - The Balmain New Ferry Company takes over the Joubert-run Lane Cove ferries. Sydney Ferries Limited takes over the service in 1917.1906 - Binngarra, the first of six similar double-ended screw steamers, enters service for the Port Jackson and Manly Steamship Company. She will be followed by Burra Bra (1908), Bellubera (1910), Balgowlah (1912), Barrenjoey (1913), and Baragoola (1922). Bellubera, Baragoola, and Barrenjoey (renamed North Head in 1951) will serve until 1973, 1983, and 1985 respectively.1906 - Sydney Ferries Limited purchases the Thompson estate at Clifton Gardens (in Mosman) including land, the three-storey hotel, wharf dancing pavilion and skating rink. The company builds a large circular swimming enclosure that holds 3,000 spectators, a boatshed and a tramway from the wharf to the hotel. The structure burns down in 1956.1907 - The Port Jackson Co-operative Steamship Company is re-incorporated as the Port Jackson and Manly Steamship Company Limited.1908 - The Upper Lane Cove River Ferry Co starts services on the Upper Lane Cove River between Figtree and Fiddens Wharf, West Killara.1909 - With increasing commuter pressure on the Milsons Point terminus, a supplementary tram line is built to McMahons Point from which ferry services to the City also operate. Kuring-gai, the archetype for the six "Binngarra-type ferries. Binngarra (1906) enters service on the Manly run. She is the first of six similar Manly ferries, three of which will be ply the harbour until the 1970s and 1980s. "K-class", Kummulla (1903-1934), arrives in Mosman Bay The original Milsons Point station and ferry terminus at the site of current North Sydney Olympic Pool ------ 2. 1930s of Photo printer 19 March 1932 - The Sydney Harbour Bridge opens. Annual passenger numbers decrease from 40 million to fourteen million. Sydney Ferries Limited services to Milsons Point and vehicular services cease. Over the next two years, Sydney Ferries pulls 18, mostly older, ferries from service. Those retired include all vehicular ferries, the older first class of "Lady-class" ferries acquired from the Balmain Company, and a number of the older K-class ferries. Also withdrawn are the large and relatively new Koompartoo and Kuttabul from the redundant Milsons Point route. They are used mainly for concert and showboat work until the outbreak of World War II.late March and early April 1932 - Vehicular ferry services between Dawes Point and Blues Point, and between Bennelong Point to Milsons Point cease less than two weeks after the bridge's opening. The 350-ton vehicular ferries, Koondooloo (1924), Kalang (1926) and Kara Kara (1926) are laid up. Other vehicular ferries are scrapped, however, Kooroongaba went to work crossing the Hunter River between Stockton and Newcastle. In the mid-1930s, demand for harbour cruises increases and the company fits out Koondooloo as a two-deck showboat. Such is her success, that Kalang is similarly fitted out as a three-deck showboat, and a third deck is later added to Koondooloo.1932/33 - The Port Jackson Company builds a large harbour pool and pavilion at Manly Cove. The pool structure is destroyed in a 1974 storm and is not rebuilt.1933 - Watsons Bay services cease with those ferries being disposed of or placed on other runs.1933 - In attempt to modernise the fleet, Lady Chelmsford is converted from steam to diesel propulsion. A Gardner diesel, two strike five-cylinder provides 190 hp (141 kW) and 10.3 knots. Conversion of the remaining four "Lady-class" ferries and Karingal and Karrabee takes place over the 1930s. In line with the modernisation drive, the varnished timber finishes of the Sydney Ferries Limited fleets are painted over in a green and gold scheme.16 November 1936 - a fire destroys Bellubera's timber superstructure while she is moored at the Kurraba Point depot. Two crew members die. She is rebuilt at the Cockatoo Island Dockyard and re-enters service in October 1937.12 February 1938 - Rodney capsizes and sinks with the loss of nineteen lives. The ferry is top-heavy carrying well-wishers on its rooftop deck fare-welling the heavy cruiser USS Louisville from the Harbour.1938 - Scottish-built South Steyne enters service on the Manly run. She is the largest steam ferry to have worked on Sydney Harbour and will become arguably the most famous of all Sydney Harbour ferries. Only the current "Freshwater-class ferries" are larger although their passenger capacities are significantly less.1939 - Nicholson Brothers Harbour Transport Pty Ltd takes over the Balmain services operating out of Erskine Street Wharf until 1964 when services are moved to Circular Quay. Manly steamer Barrenjoey (later converted to diesel and renamed North Head) crosses the Sydney Heads after her 1930s enclosing of her upper deck and wheelhouse extensions. South Steyne arriving in Sydney from Scotland, 9 September 1938, arguably Sydney's most famous ferry. The top-heavily loaded Rodney capsizes and sinks in 1938 with the loss of nineteen lives. Max Dupain photo of passengers alighting from Kubu at Circular Quay, 1938 ------ 3. 1960s of Photo printer 1960s - With significant harbourside home unit development, the Neutral Bay, Cremorne and Mosman services experience a jump in ferry patronage, the first significant rise in passenger numbers since the 1932 opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge.1961 - Manly steamer, Curl Curl, is retired after the older Baragoola (1922) returns to service after conversion to diesel power. Curl Curl is scuttled at sea in 1969.1964 - New directorship at the Port Jackson and Manly Steamship Company sees the company investing in offshore oil-rig supply service, the profits of which will be used to invest in a Manly hydrofoil service.7 January 1965 - Manly III, a Japanese-built 75-seat PT20 hydrofoil, enters service for the Port Jackson & Manly Steamship Company. It takes 15 minutes to cover the 10-kilometre (6 mi) journey from Circular Quay to Manly compared to 35 minutes for conventional ferries. Five more hydrofoils will be purchased in the 1960s and 1970s. While they can charge a premium fare for the fast trip, they fail to increase overall patronage, and they take passengers from the older ferries.1966 - The Sydney Harbour Transport Board takes over the remaining Balmain East ferry service from the Nicholson Company and "Lady-class" ferries return to the Balmain service on their way to Hunters Hill.1966 - Karingal and Karrabee are used on a short-lived attempt to run a recreational weekend service to Nielsen Park in Vaucluse.November 1966 - A 140-seat Italian-built Rodriguez PT50 hydrofoil enters service. Named Fairlight, it will be joined by Dee Why in 1970, Curl Curl in 1973, Palm Beach in 1975 and Long Reef in 1978.11 July 1968 - Manly steamer, Dee Why, makes her final trip under the command of Captain K Ross. She is sold to Strides shipbreakers in 1969 and gradually stripped. Her hull is scuttled at sea off Long Reef on 25 May 1976.1968 - Lady Cutler, the first of a new series of double-ended ferries is introduced for inner harbour service. The first of the modern "Lady-class" ferries, she will be followed by the similar Lady McKell and Lady Woodward in 1970. Larger versions of the type will follow (Lady Wakehurst in 1974 and Lady Northcott in 1975) and smaller versions in 1979 (Lady Street and Lady Herron). Apart from the unpopular Kooleen, they are the first significant new ferries introduced on the harbour since the early 1920s. Lady Cutler will be decommissioned in 1992. Sydney's first hydrofoil, the 72 seat Manly was introduced on the Manly run in 1965. Travel time to Manly is reduced from 30 minutes to 15 minutes for those willing to pay the higher fare. Lady Cutler (1968-1992), in her original livery. She is the first of the new "Lady-class" ferries Curl Curl (hulked, front) and Dee Why at Strides shipbreakers, 1969. Once the largest and fastest ferries on the harbour, Curl Curl is scuttled at sea later that year, and Dee Why is scuttled in 1976 After her 1959 conversion to diesel, the now short-funnelled Kanangra enters Mosman Bay. The Mosman, Cremorne, and Neutral Bay services experience a "mini-boom" in the 1960s due to harbourside home unit development.
Knowledge About Photo Printer
Knowledge About Photo Printer
1. Campaigning of Photo printer Since opening his first campaign office in Saint Petersburg in February 2017, Navalny plans to open at least forty offices across the country by the end of May, later increasing the number to over seventy. He has been traveling to different cities rather than focus on a few larger ones, unlike many other Russian politicians. In early April, his chief of staff Leonid Volkov stated that Navalny will continue his campaign despite the Leninsky District court upholding his five-year sentence for the Kirovles fraud case, and that Navalny intends to appeal the ban from running. He personally visited many of the locations for the opening ceremonies of the local campaign offices where he met with and spoke to his supporters. In April 2017, it was reported that Navalny's campaign staff collected more than 300,000 signatures from people across 40 regions of Russia electronically. More than 75,000 people signed up to volunteer for his campaign and nearly $700,000 has been donated. March 26 protestIn March 2017, the Anti-Corruption Foundation led by Navalny published a documentary video on YouTube titled He Is Not Dimon to You, in which he stated that Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev possessed large properties which he obtained with bribes from oligarchs and bank loans through non-governmental organizations. The video gained tens of millions of views, but the Medvedev government ignored it and did not make any response. As a result, Navalny called for mass rallies on March 26 to protest against this. Tens of thousands of people reportedly took part in the protests on that day, with rallies being held in dozens of cities across Russia (including Moscow and Saint Petersburg), using social media to organize and reportedly including large numbers of young people. After the protests, Medvedev's approval rating fell and the number of people stating in polls that they would vote for Navalny rose. Navalny was jailed for several days afterwards for disobeying orders from the police, along with somewhere between five hundred to one thousand other demonstrators. He called for more demonstrations to take place on June 12, which is the national holiday Russia Day. Attacks on Navalny and othersThere have been several instances of sabotage by unknown assailants that Alexei Navalny describes as being pro-Putin activists. In April 2017 he was splashed with the alcoholic solution of brilliant green twice, one occasion having no major effect while on the second occasion one of his eyes was damaged by chemicals, causing some loss of vision. The police have not captured the attacker although an investigation was opened. Acts of sabotage have taken place against other members of the campaign as well. In March, in the city of Tomsk, the doors to the apartments of several local campaign coordinators were glued shut with inflatable foam, while their cars were also vandalized. In the middle of the opening speech being given by Navalny police arrived and told everyone to evacuate the building due to a bomb threat. After the court rulingNavalny and his team stated on 3 May 2017 that they will be continuing their campaign despite the regional court in Kirov upholding his sentence and potentially barring him from taking part in the election, with the intention of building up support and making the Russian government allow him to participate. On 23 June 2017, the Central Election Commission stated that Navalny can not run for presidency because of his past conviction. Navalny was detained on 12 June 2017 prior to an unauthorised demonstration in Moscow which was to coincide with Russia Day, and then sentenced to 30 days in jail, which was subsequently reduced to 25 days. Autumn, third arrestIn October 2017, Navalny was detained in Moscow and then sentenced to jail time for the third time since launching his campaign, this time for organising a campaign event in Nizhny Novgorod. The event was initially agreed by the Nizhny Novgorod administration, however later permission was withdrawn. Navalny said that he had been arrested in order to prevent him from participating in future campaign events, including one planned for October 7 (Putin's birthday) in Saint Petersburg (Putin's hometown). On 4 October Navalny called for mass demonstrations to be held on October 7 in 80 cities throughout Russia. The aim of these protests was to demand real political competition in Russia and that Navalny is granted access to the elections. Registration and official rejectionOn December 24, Navalny launched his official candidacy at Serebryany Bor, Beach No. 3, located in Moscow. Here, Navalny held a meeting of an "initiative group" to register his candidacy. Navalny announced that he had gathered enough endorsements to run in the election, after his supporters had previously organized rallies in 20 cities across Russia to secure 15,000 signatures. The meeting featured a nomination ceremony, and was attended by exactly 742 supporters. He needed 500 endorsements each in 20 different cities, thus similar events were held in nineteen other cities across Russia. These events took place in Chelyabinsk, Irkutsk, Izhevsk, Krasnoyarsk, Nizhny Novgorod, Novosibirsk, Omsk, Perm. St. Petersburg, Rostov-on-Don, Samara, Saratov, Tyumen, Ufa, Vladivostok, Volgograd, Voronezh, Yaroslavl, and Yekaterinburg. The nomination in Moscow was also attended by election workers, who were there to witness that everything was being done in accordance with the law. Navalny and his supporters began to assemble the documents to officially register his candidacy with the elections committee, with some difficulty, as the low temperatures caused their printers to stop working. At the meeting, Navalny called Vladimir Putin a bad president, saying, .mw-parser-output .templatequoteoverflow:hidden;margin:1em 0;padding:0 40px.mw-parser-output .templatequote .templatequoteciteline-height:1.5em;text-align:left;padding-left:1.6em;margin-top:0"It's you, Vladimir Putin, that turned our country into a source of personal enrichment for yourself, your family, and your friends. Therefore, you should no longer be president."Navalny also alleged that Putin lacks the strong public support that he claims to hold, and that his candidacy was going prove that to be the case. After the meeting, Navalny tweeted, "I have become an official candidate nominated by activist groups of voters. Many thanks to those who have taken part in this campaign in all corners of our country. You are the best."The meeting was followed the same day by an opposition protest attended by 1,000 in Lermontov Square. The protest was a pro-Navalny demonstration organized by Ilya Yashin. On December 25, the elections commission voted that Navalny was ineligible to run for president, thus officially rejecting Navalny's candidacy and barring him from running. Navalny responded to the commission's decision by calling on his supporters to boycott the election. Navalny released a pre-recorded video following the decision, saying, "The procedure that we're invited to take part is not an election. Only Putin and the candidates he has hand-picked are taking part in it. Going to the polls right now is to vote for lies and corruption." Of his call for a boycott, Navalny told BBC, "We're declaring a strike by voters. The procedure that we're invited to take part is not an election. Only Putin and the candidates that he personally chose, ones who don't pose the slightest threat to him, are taking part."Before the decision had been announced, Navalny had commented that the speed with which they had held assembled to vote, only 18 hours after he had filed his candidacy, indicated that they had already decided beforehand to reject his candidacy. Navalny filed a lawsuit to appeal against the CECs decision in Russias Supreme Court on 28 December. At the hearing, which took place on 30 December, the Supreme Court rejected Navalnys claim. Navalny filed an appeal against the Supreme Courts ruling on 3 January 2018. January 28 protests ------ 2. Background of Photo printer Alexei Navalny announced his intention to run for President of Russia on 13 December 2016 and since then has been traveling to cities throughout Russia to meet with supporters and open regional offices. He had first spoken about doing so in April 2013, and in September of that year, he had taken part in the Moscow mayoral election, in which he got 27% of the vote. Before that, he was one of the main leaders of the 2011 protests after the parliamentary election. As noted by Newsweek and the former Russian presidential administration adviser Gleb Pavlovsky, the campaign by Navalny is unprecedented in modern Russia as most candidates do not start campaigning until a few months before the election. His chief of staff Leonid Volkov stated that part of the reason they started a year early was to raise support and to give the Russian government no choice but to let Navalny take part in the election in spite of ruling regarding the Kirovles case. The primary focus of Navalny's campaign is combating the corruption within the current government under Vladimir Putin and Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev. In mid-April 2017, Navalny was endorsed by the exiled oligarch Mikhail Khodorkovsky and the liberal People's Freedom Party leader Mikhail Kasyanov as an alternative to incumbent President Vladimir Putin. Legal caseConcerns about Navalny's participation in the elections include the "Kirovles case", when in 2009, according to investigators, Navalny ordered a local businessman to create an intermediary company then persuaded the administration of the local Kirov Oblast corporation Kirovles to sign a deal with the new company on unfavorable terms. Kirovles allegedly lost millions of dollars while the middleman company made a profit. The investigation lasted until 2013 at which point he was given a five-year prison sentence, which was suspended with a 500,000 ruble fine. In November 2016 the Russian Supreme Court annulled the sentence and returned the case to the Leninsky District court in the city of Kirov for a retrial. In February 2017, the district court ruled to uphold Navalny's sentence despite pressure from the European Court of Human Rights, which sided with Navalny. The issue may block Navalny from participating in the elections as Russian law does not allow criminal offenders to run for office, and after the retrial both Vyacheslav Volodin, speaker of the State Duma, and Medvedev's spokesman Dmitry Peskov stated that he will probably not be allowed to run. Navalny argued that the Constitution of the Russian Federation only prevents those who are in prison and those who are legally unfit from taking part in elections and believes that he is still legally able to run. In February he stated "It says clearly in the constitution that only those who are in prison are banned. So I am not banned. For now." He also said that "What we have just seen is a telegram of sorts from the Kremlin, saying that they consider me, my team and people whose views I represent too dangerous to be allowed into the election campaign." Navalny and his supporters also accuse it of being a political case, though the Russian government denies it. Leonid Volkov, his chief of staff, said that the presidential campaign will continue and that they will appeal to the European Court of Human Rights. The cases are widely believed to be fabricated in retaliation for his political activity. The Memorial Human Rights Center recognized Navalny as a political prisoner.
What Companies Are Producing Bluetooth ECG Printer?
What Companies Are Producing Bluetooth ECG Printer?
MeCan is devoted to being one of the leading producers of OBM of premium quality Bluetooth ECG printer. We will be responsible for everything such as production and development, supply chain, delivery, and promotion. If you have any specification, please send it to us. We will develop products according to your requirement.For these years, Guangzhou MeCan Medical Limited has drive harmoniously development ahead in Bluetooth ECG printer field. Body frame optimum design and advanced technology application can be seen from our Bluetooth ECG printer. Owing to Bluetooth ECG printer, MeCan has gained much more popularity than before.Paying the strictest attention to detail and safety compliance, Guangzhou MeCan Medical Limited provides the highest degree of customer service by working with our customers every step of the way. Get price!· Related Questions:1. What exhibitions do Bluetooth ECG printer manufacturers attend?Trade shows attended by manufacturers are usually targeted at the industry and those involved in or interested in the industry. MeCan usually conducts product and market tests at exhibitions to obtain industry or general opinions about our products, so as to make Bluetooth ECG printer better. Participating in trade shows can be a great way to advertise your target market and build brand awareness. ——————— 2. Any Bluetooth ECG printer factories instead of trading companies recommended?When buying in china, it's crucial to comprehend the sort of provider you're searching for. If you're thinking about purchasing the Bluetooth ECG printer out of a Chinese maker, MeCan is obviously your choice. When you purchase custom or branded merchandise (OEM / ODM), the mill usually offers additional choices. Producers (factories) have a clearer pricing arrangement, attributes and limitations compared to trading firms - making present and future product development more effective. ——————— 3. What are key manufacturers for Bluetooth ECG printer?MeCan is one of the key manufacturers of Bluetooth ECG printer in China. We guarantee to supply the best buying experience from the very first meeting through the years of after-sales service. Our values are reflected in how we conduct business, always acting legitimately and honestly with respect both for staff and customers. ——————— 4. Which Bluetooth ECG printer company doing ODM?MeCan provides ODM services. We are committed to providing complete, cost-effective solutions tailored to the specific needs of our customers. Through ODM services, we provide first-line technology products and provide quality services to leading brands in the industry.
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